TagSigmund Freud

Affect and Artificial Intelligence and The Fetish Revisited

Elizabeth A Wilson’s Affect and Artificial Intelligence traces the history and development of the field of artificial intelligence (AI) in the West, from the 1950’s to the 1990’s and early 2000’s to argue that the key thing missing from all attempts to develop machine minds is a recognition of the role that affect plays in social and individual development. She directly engages many of the creators of the field of AI within their own lived historical context and uses Bruno Latour, Freudian Psychoanalysis, Alan Turning’s AI and computational theory, gender studies,cybernetics, Silvan Tomkins’ affect theory, and tools from STS to make her point. Using historical examples of embodied robots and programs, as well as some key instances in which social interactions caused rifts in the field,Wilson argues that crucial among all missing affects is shame, which functions from the social to the individual, and vice versa.

[Cover to Elizabeth A Wilson’s Affect and Artificial Intelligence]

J.Lorand Matory’s The Fetish Revisited looks at a particular section of the history of European-Atlantic and Afro-Atlantic conceptual engagement, namely the place where Afro-Atlantic religious and spiritual practices were taken up and repackaged by white German men. Matory demonstrates that Marx and Freud took the notion of the Fetish and repurposed its meaning and intent, further arguing that this is a product of the both of the positionality of both of these men in their historical and social contexts. Both Marx and Freud, Matory says, Jewish men of potentially-indeterminate ethnicity who could have been read as “mulatto,” and whose work was designed to place them in the good graces of the white supremacist, or at least dominantly hierarchical power structure in which they lived.

Matory combines historiography,anthropology, ethnography, oral history, critical engagement Marxist and Freudian theory and, religious studies, and personal memoir to show that the Fetish is mutually a constituting category, one rendered out of the intersection of individuals, groups, places, needs, and objects. Further, he argues, by trying to use the fetish to mark out a category of “primitive savagery,” both Freud and Marx actually succeeded in making fetishes of their own theoretical frameworks, both in the original sense, and their own pejorative senses.
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Trailer for Cronenberg’s Movie on Freud and Jung

Mentioned previously here, A Dangerous Method is directed by David Cronenberg and stars Viggo Mortensen as Sigmund Freud, Michael Fassbender as Carl Jung, Keira Knightley as Sabina Spielrein and Vincent Cassel as Otto Gross.

(Thanks James!)

For more on Cronenberg, see our dossier on him

Images From David Cronenberg’s Forthcoming Film About Sigmund Freud and Carl Jung

Viggo Mortensen as Sigmund Freud in a Dangerous Method

David Cronenberg is directing a film about Sigmund Freud and Carl Jung, starring Viggo Mortensen as Freud and Michael Fassbender and Jung. The film is based on “The Talking Cure” by Christopher Hampton. Ace Showbiz has some stills.

Aceshowbiz: First Official Images From Keira Knightley’s ‘Dangerous Method’

(Thanks James K!)

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