Post World Manifesto

Industrial noise artists TCHKUNG have posted their “Post World Manifesto” online:

The Post World Movement maintains that the apocalypse has already happened and you missed it. It concerns itself not with reforming the excesses of the dominant culture, but rather with forming the culture that is to come after its last death throes. A virulent hybrid, Post World architects manipulate the scrap, garbage, and artifacts of the “real” world to create new forms of art and technology. Everywhere that you see a sculpture forged from industrial refuse, musical instruments created from car parts, baling wire and duct tape, and vehicles that run for no apparent reason. Whenever you see coyotes and raccoons dumpster diving in the heart of the urban metropolis, rogue clowns, predatory computer viruses cobbled together on makeshift systems, and squatters fabricating furniture and tapping into power lines; whenever you see these things you know the Post World Movement thrives.

Post World Industries: The Post World Manifesto
See also: 10 Chapters on Tchkung (live show review)

Future Automobiles

If water powered cars aren’t good enough for you, you should check out this French air powered car. It works by expanding air. It does require an outside powersource to compress the air in the first place, but it’s highly effecient. The car will most likely be used for taxi businesses outside the United States.
MIT Technology Review: Air-powered Autos (via Street Tech).
Another sign that the future is (finally) coming: Moller International has invented a flying car (via Boing Boing).

Trent Reznor: A Geek Before Geeks Were Cool

Salon chats with Nine Inch Nails’ Trent Reznor about technology. I think Reznor was more important in making technology “cool” than most people give him credit for.

Reznor got himself an Atari 2600 home gaming console and spent long afternoons at the house of a friend who had a coveted color RadioShack computer. Soon enough, he had his very own Commodore 64 and began teaching himself to program. He went on to study computer science at Allegheny College and worked briefly as an engineer until he decided the time was right to pursue his dreams. “When you could use computers to make music,” he says, “I wanted to be right in there.”

Salon: Trent Reznor’s Pretty Hate Machines
See Also:
This clip of Reznor talking about electronics in music from before Nine Inch Nails:

Political Statements in Runway Fashion

If runway fashion is an art, then I suppose it makes sense that it’s being used as an avenue for political expression.
David Delfin presented a show in Madrid with hooded designs resembling “burqa head-coverings that women in Afghanistan had to wear when the Muslim fundamentalist Taliban were in power.” CNN: Death hoods bring fashion protest (via Drudge Report)
Saudi haute couture artist Yehya al-Bashri created a bloody stained dress with a picture of a tank on it to protest Israel’s treatment of Palestine. NY Post: Dressed to Kill on Day Terror Returns to Israel (via Drudge Report).