Tagcoffee

Coffee: The Original Smart Drug and Aphrodisiac

Coffee: Grounds for Debate, a title in the Philosophy for Everyone series, argues that coffee is a performance-enhancing drug for thinkers. “The appropriate analogy is that coffee and philosophy go together like foreplay and sex,” insist editors Scott F Parker and Michael W Austin. “You can have one without the other, but the latter is better with the former and the former often leads to the latter.” Philosopher Basam Romaya says: “With the use of coffee, critical thinking abilities are sharpened, attention to detail enhanced.” This is a venerable claim: in the 16th century, Sheik Abd-al-Kadir, an Arab scholar, said: “No one can understand the truth until he drinks of coffee’s frothy goodness.” […]

So what about impotence? That does seem to have been overstated. The Women’s Petition Against Coffee prompted a broadside from men who argued that it “makes the erection more Vigorous, the Ejaculation more full, adds spiritualescency to the Sperme”. Initially I wasn’t sure what “spiritualescency” means, either, until I read in this book that caffeine increases sperm motility. That said, some say coffee may harm the sperm while speeding it on its way, which makes a kind of sense.

The Guardian: Can coffee wreck your marriage?

(via James Governor)

Step aside, Jesus. Russian scientists turn blood into coffee

Scientists at the Voronezh State Technological Academy have developed a method for processing blood and turning it into food products such as milk, yogurt, chocolate, and coffee.

Full Story: Moscow News: Voronezh Scientists Turn Blood into Coffee, Milk

Coffee helps prevent diabetes?

Looks like in addition to fighting Alzheimer’s, coffee may help prevent diabetes. On the other hand, it may lead to an increased risk of rheumatoid arthritis.

And by the by, check out this programmable, web controllable coffee maker, via Wired Magazine.

Coffee fuelled the information exchanges of the 17th and 18th centuries

The Economist on the role of the coffee house in politics.

The coffee-houses that sprang up across Europe, starting around 1650, functioned as information exchanges for writers, politicians, businessmen and scientists. Like today’s websites, weblogs and discussion boards, coffee-houses were lively and often unreliable sources of information that typically specialised in a particular topic or political viewpoint. They were outlets for a stream of newsletters, pamphlets, advertising free-sheets and broadsides. Depending on the interests of their customers, some coffee-houses displayed commodity prices, share prices and shipping lists, whereas others provided foreign newsletters filled with coffee-house gossip from abroad.

Full Story: The Economist: The internet in a cup

(via Mutant)

Old issues of High Times magazine

Yesterday I bought a few old issues of High Times at my local comic book store, and I must say that I’m impressed. The very first issue has an article on space migration that Timothy Leary wrote from prison and an article on tantric yoga… with pictures. A later issue has an article on coffee that claims that Guatemalan Antigua coffee is “almost psychedelic” and is “the DMT of coffee.” Hmm…

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